monkey's uncle

notes on human ecology, population, and infectious disease

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Entries Tagged as 'Infectious Disease'

Quick and Dirty Analysis of Ebola

August 14th, 2014 · No Comments · Infectious Disease, R

I've been traveling all summer while this largest Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in recorded history has raged in the West African countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and (worryingly) Nigeria. My peripatetic state has meant that I haven't been able to devote as much attention to this outbreak as I would like to. There […]

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EEID 2014 Wrap-Up

June 5th, 2014 · No Comments · Evolution, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

It's been a long time since I've written in monkey's uncle. Life has gotten pretty busy and my seeming inability to write brief entries has led me to neglect the blog this year. However, I am freshly back from the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease Conference in Fort Collins, Colorado and feel compelled to […]

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More Guilt Over Agricultural Disease Names

December 16th, 2013 · No Comments · Infectious Disease

In the spirit of my professed guilty amusement about the names of agricultural diseases, I just chuckled a bit at a promedmail update of what sounded like a biblical plague that had to be sent directly to the Apocrypha: Crayfish plague in Israel. Watch out, Pharaoh...

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Aedes aegypti in San Mateo County

August 25th, 2013 · No Comments · Human Ecology, Infectious Disease

The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which is the vector for a number of world scourges (e.g., dengue, yellow fever), has been found in San Mateo County (just across San Francisquito Creek from Stanford) for the first time since 1979. That makes three counties in California where the mosquito has been found. While not a panic-inducing development, […]

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Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease

May 25th, 2013 · No Comments · Evolution, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

I am recently back from the 2013 Ecology and Evolution of Infections Disease Conference at Penn State University. This was quite possibly the best meeting I have ever attended, not even for the science (which was nonetheless impeccable), but for the culture. I place the blame for this awesome culture firmly on the shoulders of […]

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Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease, 2013

March 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Climate Change, Conservation, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

I am recently back from the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease (EEID) Principal Investigators' Meeting hosted by the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia in lovely Athens. This is a remarable event, and a remarkable field, and I can't remember ever being so energized after returning from a professional conference (which […]

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On The Dilution Effect

March 18th, 2013 · 1 Comment · Conservation, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease

A new paper written by Dan Salkeld (formerly of Stanford), Kerry Padgett (CA Department of Public Health), and myself just came out in the journal Ecology Letters this week. One of the most important ideas in disease ecology is a hypothesis known as the "dilution effect". The basic idea behind the dilution effect hypothesis is […]

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This is Just What Greece Needs

August 23rd, 2012 · No Comments · Climate Change, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease

Greece was officially deemed malaria-free in 1974. Recent reports, however, suggest that there is ongoing autochthonous transmission of of Plasmodium vivax malaria. According to a brief report from the Mediterranean Bureau of the Italian News Agency (ANSAmed), 40 cases of P. vivax malaria have been reported in the first seven months of 2012. Of these […]

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New Grant, Post-Doc Opportunity

August 18th, 2011 · 3 Comments · Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, Primates, Social Network Analysis

Biological and Human Dimensions of Primate Retroviral Transmission One of the great enduring mysteries in disease ecology is the timing of the AIDS pandemic. AIDS emerged as a clinical entity in the late 1970s, but HIV-1, the retrovirus that causes pandemic AIDS, entered the human population from wild primates many decades earlier, probably near the […]

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A New Vector for Leishmania

December 28th, 2010 · No Comments · Infectious Disease

It isn't every day that we learn about the discovery of an entirely new vector for an important vector-borne disease. A new report by the Australian Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has identified a new species of Leishmania that is transmitted by midges, not the usual vector, sandflies. Leishmania is a vector-borne protozoan parasite that […]

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