monkey's uncle

notes on human ecology, population, and infectious disease

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Entries Tagged as 'science'

EEID 2014 Wrap-Up

June 5th, 2014 · No Comments · Evolution, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

It’s been a long time since I’ve written in monkey’s uncle. Life has gotten pretty busy and my seeming inability to write brief entries has led me to neglect the blog this year. However, I am freshly back from the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease Conference in Fort Collins, Colorado and feel compelled to […]

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AAA Recap, 2013

November 26th, 2013 · No Comments · Anthropology, science, Social Network Analysis

I guess it’s that time of the year. You know, when I recap, in my bittersweet way, the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association? I am an anthropologist, yes, but I am deeply torn in my feelings for my discipline, my department, and my flagship (?) professional organization. The question mark arises because I […]

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Should You Get a Ph.D.?

September 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Anthropology, science, Teaching

I wrote this as a long email to a list this week and, based on the feedback I’ve received, I thought it would be worthwhile posting it here. This is a topic to which I have given a lot of thought over the years, starting as a fellowships tutor at Harvard during my own grad […]

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Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease

May 25th, 2013 · No Comments · Evolution, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

I am recently back from the 2013 Ecology and Evolution of Infections Disease Conference at Penn State University. This was quite possibly the best meeting I have ever attended, not even for the science (which was nonetheless impeccable), but for the culture. I place the blame for this awesome culture firmly on the shoulders of […]

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Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease, 2013

March 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Climate Change, Conservation, Human Ecology, Infectious Disease, science

I am recently back from the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease (EEID) Principal Investigators’ Meeting hosted by the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia in lovely Athens. This is a remarable event, and a remarkable field, and I can’t remember ever being so energized after returning from a professional conference (which […]

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The Least Stressful Profession of Them All?

January 5th, 2013 · 2 Comments · science, Teaching

In the spirit of critics misunderstanding the life of university researchers that I started in my last post, I felt the need to chime in a bit on a story that has really made the social-media rounds in the last couple days. This kerfuffle stems from a Forbes piece by Susan Adams enumerating the 10 […]

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Thoughts on Black Swans and Antifragility

December 26th, 2012 · 2 Comments · science, Statistics

I have recently read the latest book by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Antifragile. I read his famous The Black Swan a while back while in the field and wrote lots of notes. I never got around to posting those notes since they were quite telegraphic (and often not even electronic!), as they were written in the […]

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On Anthropological Sciences and the AAA

November 19th, 2012 · No Comments · Anthropology, Evolution, Human Ecology, science, Teaching

I guess the time has rolled around again for my annual navel-gaze regarding my discipline, my place within it, and its future. Two strangely interwoven events have conspired to make me particularly philosophical as we enter into the winter holidays. First, I am in the middle of a visit by my friend, colleague, and former […]

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AAPA 2012 Run-Down

April 16th, 2012 · 2 Comments · Anthropology, science

I am done with this year’s American Association of Physical Anthropologists annual meeting in Portland. Alas, I am not yet home as I had a scheduling snafu with Alaska Airlines yesterday and there was literally not a single seat on a flight to any airport in the Bay Area. So, I hung out in PDX […]

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That's How Science Works

December 29th, 2010 · 5 Comments · Anthropology, science

The RealClimate blog has a very astute entry on how the controversy surrounding the recent report in the prestigious journal¬†Science that bacteria living in the arsenic-rich waters of Mono Lake in California can substitute arsenic for phosphorous in their DNA. ¬†If true, this would be a major finding because it expands the range of environments […]

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